• DOMINANT TECHNOLOGIES IN “INDUSTRY 4.0”

    MOLD DESIGN AND PRODUCTION BY USING ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING (AM) – PRESENT STATUS AND FUTURE PERSPECTIVES

    Industry 4.0, Vol. 3 (2018), Issue 2, pg(s) 82-85

    This paper covers the advanced Additive Manufacturing (AM) techniques applied to injection mold design and production. Its aim is to do a comprehensive analysis on what AM is doing for the recent and future perspectives in the field of mold’s production.

    Further analyses are done on the possible use of Rapid Tooling (RT) techniques based on AM technologies. These include plastic mold inserts made using high strength polymer resins and metal-based technologies for direct tooling work.

    Moreover, the work also reviews conformal cooling channel design based on laser sintering AM technologies and its effect in improving mold cooling efficiency to reduce cycle times, which is an important issue in the injection molding process.

    Finally, a brief techno-economical analysis is presented, as well as a comparison between the two different types of molds – the conventional ones, and molds produced by rapid tooling. The conclusions leads toward future usage of RT and AM in the mold design and
    production.

  • MATHEMATICAL MODELLING OF TECHNOLOGICAL PROCESSES AND SYSTEMS

    INVESTIGATION OF SAMPLES ACCURACY TO MODEL THE PROCESSES IN 3D PRINTING

    Mathematical Modeling, Vol. 1 (2017), Issue 4, pg(s) 192-195

    3D printing also called Layer based technology, Freeform fabrication, Additive manufacturing or Rapid Prototyping technologies has undergone significant development over the last decades. The growth is related to the expansion of the range of materials used, application areas, and range of possible sizes from nanometer to tens of meters as well as increasing machine accessibility. There is a growing consensus that 3D printing technologies will be at the heart of the next major technological revolutions. At present there are some technological specifics and associated difficulties in 3D printing one of which is the accuracy of the manufactured product. Research in this area would allow modelling of 3D printing processes.

    The article describes the possible types and sources of inaccuracies in 3D printing processes. The various types of test pieces used in practice are examined to quantify the errors in shape and sizes after building. Test pieces with predefined discrete points and methodology are provided to calculate inaccuracies. The results are presented in the terminology of “linear” and “shear” deformations. This gives opportunity to determine the variations in the shape and dimensions of the parts built by 3D printing. On the basis of the discreet results obtained, the possibility of 3D printing process modelling is discussed and presented.

  • MATERIALS

    GEOMETRY AND SURFACE ROUGHNESS OF POLYMERIC SAMPLES PRODUCED BY STEREOLITHOGRAPHY

    Machines. Technologies. Materials., Vol. 11 (2017), Issue 4, pg(s) 198-201

    The purpose of the present paper is to evaluate the geometric accuracy and surface roughness of polymeric samples manufactured by Digital Light Projection (DLP) Stereolithography. The standard cubic samples with dimensions 5 mm х 5 mm х 5 mm were printed of two polymers: NextDent C+B (white-yellowish color A3.5, VITA shade guide) and NextDent Cast (dark-red color), in two ways of placement to the base – horizontally and inclined at 45о. The samples were printed with two different layer’s thickness – 35 μm and 50μm. It was established that the samples of both polymers, manufactured in horizontal position with the lower layer’s thickness (35μm) possess highest dimensional accuracy and lowest interval of deviation. The most accurate are the dimesons parallel to the basis, while these, parallel or inclined to the print direction, have the highest deviations. The interval of the deviations of the dimensions of samples, manufactured inclined at 45o, is nearly 2-3 times higher, as the interval of the samples, made of NextDent Cast, is more than 50% higher than that of NextDent C+B. The horizontally printed samples have 1.5-2 times lower surface roughness compared to the samples, printed inclined at 45o. The surface roughness of the samples, made of NextDent Cast, is 30-50% higher than that of NextDent C+B independently of the layer’s thickness. The increase of the thickness from 35 μm to 50μm leads to 1.5-2 times higher surface roughness in the two samples’ positions. The optical properties of both polymers in the research strongly influence the geometric characteristics, dimensional accuracy and surface roughness of the objects, manufactured by DLP stereolithography.

  • A METHOD TO ESTIMATE LOADING OF A MOTOR-GRADER BLADE CONTROL HYDRAULIC CYLINDERS

    Machines. Technologies. Materials., Vol. 9 (2015), Issue 12, pg(s) 75-77

    Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) is a revolutionary technology that allows a production of fully functional metal parts directly from a 3D CAD data, eliminating the investment to production tools and technologies which brings considerable cost and time savings. Metal parts made by DMLS technology are fully comparable with casted or machined parts. A range of application of DMLS technologies is very wide – from prototypes, through short-run production to final products. Advantages of DMLS technology are arising along with complexity of parts – more complex geometry of parts (in terms of shape and occurrence of the detail) make DMLS technology even more economically effective.

  • RAPID PROTOTYPING – DEFINITION OF TERMS AND HOW TO APPLY DURING A STUDENT PROJECT

    Machines. Technologies. Materials., Vol. 8 (2014), Issue 9, pg(s) 44-46

    Nowadays the field of Rapid Prototyping is rapidly changing and providing a clear overview is challenging. One of the biggest problems in this context is that different operations are often named similar. In the beginning of this paper the most important related terms are defined and classified. Afterwards the major Rapid Prototyping techniques, called generative manufacturing methods, are explained.

    Alternatives to these generative methods as well as 3D-scanning methods are dealt with too. All in all these emerging technologies around 3D-printing and 3D-scanning are revolutionizing the way Rapid Prototyping laboratories look like. They offer new possibilities and reduce the complexity of prototyping. One of the future trends is so called Fab Labs which are currently stretching the boundaries of the common Rapid Prototyping laboratories. At Graz University of Technology the second Fab Lab in Austria has been established lately. Especially its implementation in University education as part of the Product Innovation Project is discussed in detail.

  • EFFECT OF OXYGEN AND NITROGEN CONTENTS ON THE STRUCTURE OF THE Ti-6Al-4V ALLOY MANUFACTURED BY SELECTIVE LASER MELTING

    Materials Science. Non-Equilibrium Phase Transformations., Vol. 3 (2017), Issue 3, pg(s) 2-103

    TiAl6V (ELI) has the low density, low elastic modulus and high strength. Biocompatibility of this material allows one to adapt it to human implant production and successfully use in the manufacture of surgical implants. Spherical argon-atomized Ti6Al4V (ELI) (45µm) powder from TLS Technik was used for study. The chemical composition complies with the ASTM F-136 (grade 5), ASTM B348 (grade 23) standard for surgical implant applications. Two machines from two scientific centers (Russia and South Africa) were used for the manufacturing of the alloys. Analysis of the oxygen and nitrogen contamination in SLM alloys was done with Van de Graaff accelerator with 2 Mega Volts. It is found that the oxygen concentration in both samples is about 0.2 wt. % and decreases with the increasing of the sample depth; the nitrogen concentration is about 0,02 wt%. X-Ray results show an absence of beta (BCC) phase in both samples. TEM studies found the metastable martensitic structure and silicon nitride Si3N4.