• REDUCTION OF EMISSIONS FROM OFF-ROAD HEAVY-DUTY DIESEL ENGINES USING CATALYZED DIESEL PARTICULATE FILTER

    Machines. Technologies. Materials., Vol. 10 (2016), Issue 4, pg(s) 50-54

    Several different techniques and methodologies have been applied to reduce emissions from diesel engines. The main by- products of diesel engine combustion are carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, total hydrocarbons, oxides of nitrogen, and particulate matter.
    Diesel particulate matter and oxides of nitrogen are two of the most potentially harmful components of the diesel engine exhaust. Since 1990, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has been regulating off-road diesel emissions and imposing rules and standards on manufacturers and operators. The objectives of this study was to determine the mechanical durability of Diesel Particulate Filters (DPF) that are retrofitted on off-road heavy duty diesel engines, over prolonged periods of in-field operation and to assess the emission benefits of particulate catalyzed filter. The specific task was to evaluate the exhaust emissions from a Caterpillar 3408 engine on an engine dynamometer. Since the ability of the DPFs in reducing particulate matter (PM) emissions was of a prime concern, it was concluded that the DPFs are very effective in achieving up to 98% reduction.

  • POTENTIALS FOR OZONE FORMING FROM OFF-ROAD HEAVY-DUTY DIESEL ENGINE’S EMISSIONS

    Machines. Technologies. Materials., Vol. 10 (2016), Issue 3, pg(s) 20-23

    Ground level ozone is one major secondary pollutant which is formed in the atmosphere by a variety of photochemical reactions involving volatile organic compounds and oxides of nitrogen in the presence of sunlight. Due to their reactivity, the exhaust emissions from heavy duty diesel engines are of particular concern and it is desirable to reduce the ozone forming potential of the exhaust emissions by reducing the mass of exhaust emissions. This study investigates the effect of retrofitted after-treatment devices and ultra-low sulfur diesel fuels on the ozone forming potential of exhaust emissions from heavy-duty off-road diesel engines. Specifically, the objective was to determine the effect of two diesel particulate filters and two ultra-low sulfur diesel fuels on the ozone forming potential from the 3 test diesel engines retrofitted with and without passive diesel particulate filters.